Adamstown to ‘curb’ overzealous sidewalk fixers

By on June 20, 2018

The Adamstown YMCA recently recognized Daryn Ebersol, a Cocalico High School student, as he received the Youth Champion Award for 2018. Pictured (left to right) are Justin Baas, program director, Daryn Ebersol, and Adamstown Branch Executive Alyssa Bushkie. Photo by Adamstown YMCA

The Adamstown YMCA recently recognized Daryn Ebersol, a Cocalico High School student, as he received the Youth Champion Award for 2018. Pictured (left to right) are Justin Baas, program director, Daryn Ebersol, and Adamstown Branch Executive Alyssa Bushkie. Photo by Adamstown YMCA

 

 

Residents of Cocalico are complaining of speeding buses driven by the Cocalico School District while they are carrying children.

Resident Kerry Fisher lives across from Adamstown Elementary School.

“I would like to address the speeding going on,” said Fisher. “School buses don’t do 15 mph.”

Fisher said Adamstown Elementary is the only school in the district that doesn’t have flashing lights “in the morning and afternoon, saying it’s a school zone.”

“Yeah, I know they’re not coming 15 mph down that hill, bringing the kids down,” said Fisher.

Fisher said there are “a lot of (traffic) signs on Main Street, but not on Adamstown Road.”

“The worst offenders on Stoudtburg Road are the school busses,” said Stephanie Scheifley, from the audience.

At the May 14 Denver Borough meeting, resident Mike Deetz voiced his concern with speeding on his street, “especially before and after school.”

“A lot of them are buses,” said Deetz. “I got the license plate from one.”

Ephrata Police Department officer, Andrew Orwig, said he would look in to the speeding issue.

In other news, residents seem antsy to take matters into their own hands over repairing their sidewalks and curbs at their own expense. Nearly two years ago, Mike Wetherhold attempted to provide council a list of residents who needed repairs and define an ordinance which would give residents detailed direction to take to make fixes.

Wetherhold resigned council due to health reasons, as did the “sidewalk inspector.”

Seemingly without direction, residents are hacking, spading, and grinding their sidewalks and curbs without knowing if it will meet regulations.

“One of my neighbors, actually a couple of my neighbors, have attempted to grind down the sidewalk,” said Cindy Schweitzer, on council. “They’re just like a ramp now. It would not comply. It’s now an incline as opposed to being a trip hazard… it’s a slope.”

“I have seen some people that have actually chipped away the top surface and used material to repair it and so forth, and it’s held up well,” said President Randy Good.

“We got a letter but it wasn’t specific,” said Scheifley. “I didn’t know what had to be fixed and I kept calling to have somebody come and show us. He said it could have been a mistake, so we’re unclear of what we should do,” said Scheifley.

“We need clear-cut specifications, and we need a clear-cut plan as to how we’re going to do it,” said Good. “The easiest way, in my opinion, is for us to send somebody out there and mark them (sidewalks/curbs) and then people know what they’re supposed to do.”

“So, for now, what should we do?” asked Scheifley.

“You’re on hold,” said Good.

A letter of sidewalk and curb specifications “should” go out in July with residents’ water bills.

Councilman Shad Lewis will oversee the issue.

Schweitzer made a motion to contact a third party to do the work.

The motion was approved. Mark Bansner and Alex McManimen were absent.

Justin Baas, program director, Adamstown YMCA, attended the meeting to update council on their activities.

The YMCA recently recognized Daryn Ebersol, a Cocalico High School student, as having received the Youth Champion Award for 2018.

“He was recognized at our breakfast of champions association fundraiser for the youth champion award,” said Baas. “He was the one youth among all the branches that exemplifies service and our mission. It’s a pretty big honor.”

Baas talked more about the mission at the YMCA.

“We believe that positive, lasting, personal, and social change can only come about when we all work together,” said Baas. “Invest in our kids, our health and our community.”

Baas is interested in getting companies and institutions excited about supporting their mission.

“We have sponsorship levels and their reflective contribution-how that is seen in the community,” said Baas. “For example, $500 gave ten kids the chance to excel in a sports youth program, $250 allowed 20 kids and their parents to attend a special event.”

The next council meeting will be held the second Tuesday in July, not the first, to avoid having it during the holiday.

Michele Walter Fry welcomes your comments at michelewalterfry@gmail.com.

 

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