For some CHS Mini-THON participants, the cause is personal

By on March 23, 2016

 

Though reaching their funding goal fell a bit short, the fun quota was high at the fourth annual Cocalico High School Mini-THON held Saturday, March 19, at the school.

The six-hour, no-sitting event raises money for the Four Diamonds Fund.

About 130 CHS students donated their time to help raise money and awareness for childhood cancer, which in the end totaled $6,563.94.

Student Hunter Leisey raised the most money. In his case, it seemed almost like a payback. He was diagnosed with leukemia in 2012 and has had no sign of cancer for the past three years.

 Austin Sattler, Hunter Leisey, and Kyle Clancy were happy to participate.  Leisey raised the most funds as an individual.

Austin Sattler, Hunter Leisey, and Kyle Clancy were happy to participate. Leisey raised the most funds as an individual.

“I feel great, like I never had cancer,” smiled Leisey. “I’m even playing hockey again.”

Leisey is a Junior Hershey Bear hockey player and has become friends with some of the Hershey Bears. They text back-and-forth after games.

The Four Diamonds Fund is a non-profit organization that provides financial support to families of children who are battling cancer at Penn State Hershey Children’s Hospital.

“It helped me get through it and our family with the costs,” Leisey said. “The money all goes to the Four Diamond Club.”

Two students from the Penn State Ski Club THON group drove to the event from State College to support their “THON family,” even though it was during exams.

“They are a great family,” said Kyle Clancy. “I’ve known them for two years and anytime we’re together, it’s a great time.”

The THONers played bingo, dodgeball, social quiz games, volleyball, played ping pong and badminton tourneys, a tennis ball knockoff game, and had a tug-of-war contest.

Unfortunately, the goal of $10,000 was not met.

“It’s growing,” said Courtney Hall, math teacher and advisor to Mini-Thon. “We have more students this year, so that’s always a positive, so hopefully we’ll keep growing.”

Rachel Weaver cuts the hair of Lynn Keene, learning support teacher.

Rachel Weaver cuts the hair of Lynn Keene, learning support teacher.

Lynn Keene, learning support teacher, had her hair cut by Amy Sue from Styles Underground in Adamstown, and donated her locks to those going through cancer treatments.

“I’ve been growing my hair just for this,” Keene said.

Her husband, John Keene, passed away from colon cancer in 2011.

“After he passed away, the kids wanted to do something, so we’re having our fifth 5K for Johnnie K in Adamstown in June,” Keene said. “All of the money raised for it goes to a local family in the community to help pay bills while they’re going through cancer.”

“I can’t imagine how parents of kids with cancer go through it,” Keene said.

Photos by Michele Walter Fry Shannon Glover, Emily Harting and Rachel Weaver enjoy Mini-THON.

Photos by Michele Walter Fry
Shannon Glover, Emily Harting and Rachel Weaver enjoy Mini-THON.

Rachel Weaver had fun at the Mini-THON

“I’ve been trying to raise as much money for cancer as I can because my grandma died of cancer,” said Weaver. “I think it’s a really good cause, especially for the kids.”

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