In Denver, streetlights and a bridge dominate discussion

By on September 30, 2015

 

With the clock ticking on Denver Borough’s $227,400 grant to assist with street-light privatization, officials discussed three cost options for the LED upgrade project at the Monday, Sept. 28, council meeting.

“There is the ‘required basic’ cost of approximately $309,000, the variable being whether the borough uses Cobra Head LED fixtures or Decorative LED fixtures,” said Borough Manager Mike Hession. “This required basic cost includes labor costs covering fixture installation for 344 streetlights, fuse installation (250), and junction box installation (20) plus related costs for engineering, design construction, inspection, contractor bond, insurance, and administration.”

Total system costs (including “basic” costs described above) for three options range from $472,000 to $667,000. A choice can’t be made until there is a buy-back contract with PPL.

“I’ve forwarded a PPL settlement proposal to our consultant,” said Hession. “Of course, our solicitor will have to look at it, then council. PPL might agree, might offer a counter proposal or we may need one big meeting.”

The borough hired Attorney Todd Stewart, who has helped expedite responses from PPL, to keep the project on schedule. Savings projected from Denver’s streetlight privatization could be up to $50,000 annually. The grant requires readiness for the street light work bidding process by June 2016.

In another matter, council members discussed and approved starting the process to rename the Main Street Bridge at Denver Memorial Park for the late Samuel (Sam) Snyder. Snyder was a builder and owned much of the land in the borough. He built many homes, the fire company, donated land for Denver Memorial Park, and the fire company, plus served as fire chief for many years.

Photo by Alice Hummer    The Main Street Bridge at Denver Memorial Park will be renamed in honor of the late Samuel (Sam) Snyder, a Denver resident who ciontributed much to the community. As it is a PennDOT bridge, the naming will require an act of the state Legislature. State Rep. Mindy Fee will shepherd the process.

Photo by Alice Hummer
The Main Street Bridge at Denver Memorial Park will be renamed in honor of the late Samuel (Sam) Snyder, a Denver resident who ciontributed much to the community. As it is a PennDOT bridge, the naming will require an act of the state Legislature. State Rep. Mindy Fee will shepherd the process.

Last month Zeager Brothers, located in Middletown, Dauphin County, informed council members that they could no longer chip the woody waste pile and transport it back across the Lancaster County line. Lancaster County is one of six counties quarantined due to evidence of the walnut twig beetle. Council decided for the immediate time to contract with Martin Mulch.

The borough lot also collects grass clippings. When it rains, the grass and woody waste sometimes produce grey water.

“We could look at a series of rain gardens to act as a border and a filter,” said Hession, “and consider applying for a DEP Stormwater Best Management Practices Implementation Grant to assist with these costs. If council wants to do this, I need to move on this since the grant application is due Oct. 9.”

Council approved Hession applying for the grant on behalf of the borough.

In other business:

* Junior Councilman Ken Wallace reported he is ready to meet with school officials regarding student support for a School Resource Officer (SRO). Council Vice President Mike Gensemer, who chaired the meeting in the absence of President Blake Daub, said: “Eleven out of 17 school districts in Lancaster County have an SRO. We have an officer who, on Dec. 31, will be 19 days away from vesting with 12 years of service. If there’s ever a time to step up to the plate and take action, now is the time for the school to act.” (Note: Although Ephrata Borough officials have said that they will consider hiring furloughed East Cocalico Police officers, an officer generally does not take his/her years of service toward vesting for a pension with him/her.)

“That’s not right.,” commented Councilman Michael Cohick. “Why so long? Most people vest after five years of service.”

* Denver Fire Chief Shannon Hilton reported a total of 148 calls to date this year, an average of 13.6 firemen per call and an average response time of 3.8 minutes. Five classroom and hands-on trainings are scheduled from now through January, including two running cooperatively with Adamstown Fire Company.

* Kyle Sellers from Adamstown Library presented the organization’s annual report. Patron visits are up 23 percent, numbering 93,000. The STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) programs are popular.

“Every STEM program was over-booked,” said Sellers. Peace Church donated a dedicated space for the popular new “Family Place” program. Denver had 88 summer reading program participants.

About

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *