Longtime Denver cabin a sad loss Longtime Denver cabin a sad loss Longtime Denver cabin a sad loss

By on December 21, 2011

By: ALICE HUMMER Review Correspondent ALICE HUMMER Review Correspondent ALICE HUMMER Review Correspondent, Staff Writer

While many families sustained heartbreaking losses in the violent fall flooding, three generations of Denver Boy Scouts see the recent demise of the spartan, 28 by 40-foot wooden scout cabin with no indoor restrooms, located in Denver Park, as the loss of a positive piece of their childhood.

"It’s good to be able to meet in local places, such as churches," veteran Scout Randy Eshelman said. "However, usually the space is shared, and you need to clean up everything when the meeting is over. At the scout cabin each patrol could decorate their own corner."

Eshelman recalled Halloween parties when the cabin became a haunted house. Then there were the Christmas parties, campfires for Court of Honor ceremonies, and overnight and longer camping experiences.

"In the winter if the weather was ugly and you couldn’t get out of town, you could always manage to get to the nearby cabin in the park."

"We’d have weekend camping where we’d roast a pig all week-end and then have it for a family picnic on Sunday," Eshelman, 48, recalls.

"One weekend the pig was roasting on a spit on the cabin’s porch, Eshelman said. In the early hours of Saturday morning, sparks caught the porch on fire. We kicked the pig off the porch and extinguished where sparks started to burn the porch. In the morning, we hosed down the pig, put it back on the spit and everything tasted fine at the family picnic on Sunday."

"There was so much flexibility because you had your own building," Eshelman concluded.

The building’s floor was a total loss, as well as the walls up to the ceiling.

Mike Grant, charter scout organization representative, Mark Jenke and others also familiar with construction crawled underneath the floor structure; nothing was salvageable. They treated the walls to deter mold growth.

"The older style Celutex insulation sucked up the water all the way to the ceiling," Grant explained. "There is much mold."

The cabin sits 30 inches off the ground and sustained another forty-six inches of water.

"We’re waiting to see what happens with the information that Denver borough manager Mike Hession assisted us with turning in to FEMA. We have some preliminary drawings made, and we’re still looking at moving to higher ground," Grant said.

"Once we figure out specifically what a new cabin will cost and where it will be placed, we will need a campaign for donations," Grant said. "We deal with lots of different groups, and, most likely we’ll initiate a bank fund earmarked for the Boy Scout cabin’s replacement."

Some Denver residents may recall that originally the cabin was located behind High Concrete and belonged to the American Legion. When the PA Turnpike came through Denver in the early 1950′s, the cabin was donated to the Boy Scouts and moved, in three pieces, to its present location. While many families sustained heartbreaking losses in the violent fall flooding, three generations of Denver Boy Scouts see the recent demise of the spartan, 28 by 40-foot wooden scout cabin with no indoor restrooms, located in Denver Park, as the loss of a positive piece of their childhood.

"It’s good to be able to meet in local places, such as churches," veteran Scout Randy Eshelman said. "However, usually the space is shared, and you need to clean up everything when the meeting is over. At the scout cabin each patrol could decorate their own corner."

Eshelman recalled Halloween parties when the cabin became a haunted house. Then there were the Christmas parties, campfires for Court of Honor ceremonies, and overnight and longer camping experiences.

"In the winter if the weather was ugly and you couldn’t get out of town, you could always manage to get to the nearby cabin in the park."

"We’d have weekend camping where we’d roast a pig all week-end and then have it for a family picnic on Sunday," Eshelman, 48, recalls.

"One weekend the pig was roasting on a spit on the cabin’s porch, Eshelman said. In the early hours of Saturday morning, sparks caught the porch on fire. We kicked the pig off the porch and extinguished where sparks started to burn the porch. In the morning, we hosed down the pig, put it back on the spit and everything tasted fine at the family picnic on Sunday."

"There was so much flexibility because you had your own building," Eshelman concluded.

The building’s floor was a total loss, as well as the walls up to the ceiling.

Mike Grant, charter scout organization representative, Mark Jenke and others also familiar with construction crawled underneath the floor structure; nothing was salvageable. They treated the walls to deter mold growth.

"The older style Celutex insulation sucked up the water all the way to the ceiling," Grant explained. "There is much mold."

The cabin sits 30 inches off the ground and sustained another forty-six inches of water.

"We’re waiting to see what happens with the information that Denver borough manager Mike Hession assisted us with turning in to FEMA. We have some preliminary drawings made, and we’re still looking at moving to higher ground," Grant said.

"Once we figure out specifically what a new cabin will cost and where it will be placed, we will need a campaign for donations," Grant said. "We deal with lots of different groups, and, most likely we’ll initiate a bank fund earmarked for the Boy Scout cabin’s replacement."

Some Denver residents may recall that originally the cabin was located behind High Concrete and belonged to the American Legion. When the PA Turnpike came through Denver in the early 1950′s, the cabin was donated to the Boy Scouts and moved, in three pieces, to its present location. While many families sustained heartbreaking losses in the violent fall flooding, three generations of Denver Boy Scouts see the recent demise of the spartan, 28 by 40-foot wooden scout cabin with no indoor restrooms, located in Denver Park, as the loss of a positive piece of their childhood.

"It’s good to be able to meet in local places, such as churches," veteran Scout Randy Eshelman said. "However, usually the space is shared, and you need to clean up everything when the meeting is over. At the scout cabin each patrol could decorate their own corner."

Eshelman recalled Halloween parties when the cabin became a haunted house. Then there were the Christmas parties, campfires for Court of Honor ceremonies, and overnight and longer camping experiences.

"In the winter if the weather was ugly and you couldn’t get out of town, you could always manage to get to the nearby cabin in the park."

"We’d have weekend camping where we’d roast a pig all week-end and then have it for a family picnic on Sunday," Eshelman, 48, recalls.

"One weekend the pig was roasting on a spit on the cabin’s porch, Eshelman said. In the early hours of Saturday morning, sparks caught the porch on fire. We kicked the pig off the porch and extinguished where sparks started to burn the porch. In the morning, we hosed down the pig, put it back on the spit and everything tasted fine at the family picnic on Sunday."

"There was so much flexibility because you had your own building," Eshelman concluded.

The building’s floor was a total loss, as well as the walls up to the ceiling.

Mike Grant, charter scout organization representative, Mark Jenke and others also familiar with construction crawled underneath the floor structure; nothing was salvageable. They treated the walls to deter mold growth.

"The older style Celutex insulation sucked up the water all the way to the ceiling," Grant explained. "There is much mold."

The cabin sits 30 inches off the ground and sustained another forty-six inches of water.

"We’re waiting to see what happens with the information that Denver borough manager Mike Hession assisted us with turning in to FEMA. We have some preliminary drawings made, and we’re still looking at moving to higher ground," Grant said.

"Once we figure out specifically what a new cabin will cost and where it will be placed, we will need a campaign for donations," Grant said. "We deal with lots of different groups, and, most likely we’ll initiate a bank fund earmarked for the Boy Scout cabin’s replacement."

Some Denver residents may recall that originally the cabin was located behind High Concrete and belonged to the American Legion. When the PA Turnpike came through Denver in the early 1950′s, the cabin was donated to the Boy Scouts and moved, in three pieces, to its present location. More CABIN, page A11

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