Recycling profits East Cocalico

By on August 27, 2014

One woman’s idea turns cardboard into money

One man’s (or community’s) trash has become East Cocalico’s cash.

The trash: corrugated cardboard.

The cash: A tripling of the funds returned to the township from Pennsylvania’s Act 101 Recycling Program Performance Grant.

(From left) Supervisor Alan Fry, assistant recycling coordinator, Lisa Kashner, recyling coordinator and East Cocalico Township Manager Mark Hiester stand in front of the large, recycling container for corrugated cardboard donated by Good's Disposal. (Photo by Alice Hummer)

(From left) Supervisor Alan Fry, assistant recycling coordinator, Lisa Kashner, recyling coordinator and East Cocalico Township Manager Mark Hiester stand in front of the large, recycling container for corrugated cardboard donated by Good’s Disposal. (Photo by Alice Hummer)

The corrugated cardboard has been collected since October 2011 when Good’s Disposal provided a collection container at no cost to East Cocalico Township. The recycling has morphed into fiscal benefits for the municipality.

Lisa Kashner, township secretary and recycling coordinator, announced earlier this summer the receipt of $180,666 for East Cocalico’s state recycling grant money.

“Based on the previous year’s grant money received, we plugged in a number in the $60,000-$65,000 range when we did budget planning,” said East Cocalico Manager Mark Hiester,

The nearly triple dividend, which goes into the general fund, “is a result of township resident, June Kinback, persuading us to incorporate this into our recycling program,” said Doug Mackley, supervisor chairman.

“We need to acknowledge the exemplary efforts of commercial businesses in the township which take the time to compress and haul their cardboard to our collection site,” said Hiester.

“We get paid in tonnage,” said Kashner. “Our total commercial tonnage was 28,120.9 tons for 2012, which is the year for which the check was written. It is customary to receive grant money two years after the year has ended.”

“We empty the large cardboard dumpster almost monthly,” said Kashner. “These companies must return forms we send to them and then I compile by hand the information submitted and forward it to Lancaster County Solid Waste.”

All township offices recycle. The 20-foot-tall stone pile adjacent to the woody waste pile will be sifted so that stones can be reused by the road crew. Township road crew workers diligently pick up any scrap metal.

Monies received must be used to enhance recycling efforts.

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