Former Doneckers Restaurant property is under contract

By on February 15, 2017
The two-story, former Doneckers Restaurant building, most recently occupied by the Sugar Arts Institute is, 7,400 square feet and comes with a 26-space parking lot. Photo by Patrick Burns
The two-story, former Doneckers Restaurant building, most recently occupied by the Sugar Arts Institute is, 7,400 square feet and comes with a 26-space parking lot. Photo by Patrick Burns

The two-story, former Doneckers Restaurant building, most recently occupied by the Sugar Arts Institute is, 7,400 square feet and comes with a 26-space parking lot. Photo by Patrick Burns

The former Restaurant at Doneckers property, 333 N. State St., Ephrata, is under contract for sale.

John Male, a businessman from Lititz who has family ties to Ephrata, is scheduled to make settlement on the property on Thursday. The sale price was not disclosed.

Male, who plans to relocate two of his Lancaster-based businesses to Ephrata, said the property is zoned residential commercial. He expects to file for a zoning exception from Ephrata to open offices there.

He plans to open local offices of Infinity Real Estate and Infinity Fitness, now located at 911 State Street, Lancaster.

The two-story building, most recently occupied by the Sugar Arts Institute is, 7,400 square feet and comes with a 26-space parking lot.

Male said he’s not sure what besides his businesses will occupy the building. He hopes to honor the Doneckers legacy by merging the name with his business with the permission of the Doneckers family.

Doneckers began in 1961 when C. Paul Donecker and his son, H. William, started selling women’s clothing out of two apartments on North State Street.

They soon opened a store at the corner of Walnut and North State streets. In 1978, a men’s apparel section was opened, as was a section for children’s clothing.

Bill Donecker branched out in 1984, adding the restaurant in the former Groff’s grocery store.

He also opened several guesthouses.

The Artworks at Doneckers opened in 1989 at a former shoe factory south of the store and, 10 years later, Donecker replaced many of the art shops with an extensive line of fine, hand-crafted furniture.

Look for more coverage of this story at the Ephrata Review’s Facebook page this week following settlement of the property along with fresh photos inside the property and an interview with Mr. Male.

Patrick Burns is social media editor and a staff writer for The Ephrata Review. He welcomes your questions and comments and can be reached at pburns.eph@lnpnews.com or at 721-4455.

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