Land of the free because of the brave

By on November 14, 2018
Veterans wait to introduce themselves to the students at the Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 12. Photo by Missi Mortimer

Veterans wait to introduce themselves to the students at the Veterans Day assembly on Nov. 12. Photo by Missi Mortimer

Adamstown Elementary salutes veterans

Adamstown Elementary School held the second annual Veterans Day event on Nov. 12, spearheaded by third grade teacher, Lisa Borry.

“We’ve had a great response,” said Borry.

There were 41 veterans in attendance, many family or neighbors of Adamstown students who had been invited by the students themselves. Students joined the vets for breakfast in the school cafeteria and assumed leadership roles for the morning, clearing plates from veterans and participating in the musical portions of the assembly.

Bruce Deisinger was the speaker for the event. Photo by Missi Mortimer

Bruce Deisinger was the speaker for the event. Photo by Missi Mortimer

Army veteran Bruce Deisinger was the speaker at this year’s event. He shared about himself and engaged the students by asking what they thought a veteran was and what Veterans Day is for.

After the assembly, the Parade of Heroes commenced, in which the veterans walked through the halls of the school and students had the opportunity to say “thank you” for their years of service.

“It’s great that the kids have a chance to celebrate,” said Army vet Bill Hyman, who served in the Korean War. “They seem to be excited. It’s a chance to be connected to vets from different eras.”

First grader Devon Rapp walked with with his grandfather, Jon Newcomer, during the Parade of Heroes. Photo by Missi Mortimer

First grader Devon Rapp walked with with his grandfather, Jon Newcomer, during the Parade of Heroes. Photo by Missi Mortimer

Jim Stamm, another Army vet and last year’s guest speaker, agreed. “It’s great to see the reaction of the kids. They don’t really realize that these people — all of the veterans — we had other lives.”

Denton Borry served in the Air Force for four years. “I appreciate that kids are being made aware of their history,” he said. “They need to know. It’s ingrained in the country.”

Aubree Fahringer is the Cocalico editor for The Ephrata Review.

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