South Sixth and Franklin intersection remains a concern in Denver

By on November 18, 2015

 

A concern about the South Sixth and Franklin streets intersection was the first topic of discussion at the Nov. 9 Denver borough council meeting.

Mike Deetz of 429 S. Sixth St. repeated worries that he had previously expressed to council members.

“About a year ago I asked if the police could do something about the speeding and running of the stop sign at South Sixth Street and Franklin,” he said.

Photo by Alice Hummer The South Sixth and Franklin streets intersection doesn't look especially busy here.  But South Sixth Street is clogged with school traffic from 3 to 3:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Residents living near this intersection voiced safety concerns regarding school complex traffic that enters South Sixth Street via Franklin, often "blowing through" the stop sign in order to beat oncoming school  traffic.

Photo by Alice Hummer
The South Sixth and Franklin streets intersection doesn’t look especially busy here. But South Sixth Street is clogged with school traffic from 3 to 3:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Residents living near this intersection voiced safety concerns regarding school complex traffic that enters South Sixth Street via Franklin, often “blowing through” the stop sign in order to beat oncoming school traffic.

“I’d like to know if any police sat down there and if any citations were issued. People don’t drift through the stop sign; they power through it. This all happens between 3 to 3:30 p.m. We have young children on our street and it’s a dangerous situation.”

Councilman Mike Cohick said he parked his car at that location and observed exactly what Deetz described. Council President Blake Daub said East Cocalico Police would be made aware of the matter, and that Chief George Beever attends the last council meeting of the month.

Deetz said he would try to be present at the next meeting on Monday, Nov. 30.

Discussion concerning the latest finance committee meeting work on the 2016 proposed budget boded well for taxpayers.

“The finance committee discussed decreasing the proposed real estate tax increase from .25 mill to a .125 mill increase, which is one-half the impact originally looked at,” said Borough Manager Mike Hession.

A homeowner with a $135,000 home (average home cost in Denver) could see a tax increase of approximately $215 instead of about $430, which was in the first draft of the proposed 2016 budget.

“The finance committee looked hard for items which might be cut and it’s very difficult this year,” said Councilman Jason South. “We are sensitive to the fact that people on a fixed incomes did not receive any increase in Social Security and economics for families are tight.”

“Our big outstanding issue which affects the budget is the streetlight cost,” said Hession. “We don’t know exactly how much we’re going to need to purchase the street lights.”

Denver received a $227,000 grant to assist with purchasing either brand new street lights or buying back some streetlights from PPL and purchasing the remainder of more than 300 lights needed. The reason for owning the streetlights is possible savings of more than $50,000 annually.

During the last two years the borough worked with PPL to bring the street light acquisition project to conclusion. Earlier this year Denver hired Todd Stewart, an attorney specializing in public utilities work, to expedite dealings with PPL because grant deadlines for items needing to be accomplished in 2016 are approaching.

The finance committee recommended a lease-to-purchase option for the proposed purchase of a dump truck, salt spreader, and snow plow rather than purchasing this equipment in 2016.

The finance committee will continue to work on the proposed 2016 budget with the goal of authorizing advertising the proposed budget at the Nov. 30 meeting.

Official action to adopt the 2016 budget is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 28.

In other business, council:

* Appointed Weinhold, Nickel and Company as the independent auditor for the borough’s 2015 financial records.

* Approved an ordinance which brings Denver’s street specifications up to date with PennDOT’s.

“It puts us where we need to be,” said Hession. “It’s guidance for either rebuilding a street or building a new one.”

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